Marine Vet Saves Paralyzed Man From House Fire | Veterans in the News

Marine Vet Saves Paralyzed Man From House Fire

August 26, 2016

Marine Vet Saves Paralyzed Man From House Fire

Morgan Jones, not the actor from The Walking Dead, but the real life hero, Marine veteran Morgan Jones, was in the news recently.  He was working a construction site in a Tennessee neighborhood early one morning when he noticed a house fire.  

 

Around 6 a.m., Jones called 911 to report the fire.  It was at that point that someone told him there were people stuck inside the flaming abode.  "Being in the Marine Corps, I just jumped in and started doing what I could to help save lives," Jones told WHBQ. 

 

When Jones looked inside the house he could see a man pinned to the ground by his wheelchair, struggling to crawl across the floor to an exit.  Years of experience, training and the will to succeed overcame Jones as he jumped into action.  Another bystander, Aaron Nathaniel broke a window to the house and pushed the glass aside.  Jones climbed through to assist the paralyzed man.

 

News Clip - Veteran Saves Handicapped Man from house fire

 

“I crawled in, wrapped my shirt around my face, got the wheelchair out of the way and drug him as far as I could to the window,” Jones said.  

 

When news reporters asked Jones if he was scared during the rescue, he replied, “"No, sir. Been through worse."  

 

Four people escaped the fire.  The paralyzed man was taken to the hospital for treatment and Aaron Nathaniels was treated on the scene.  

 

We thank Morgan Jones for his selfless and heroic actions!  And we are remembered of other military veterans who have jumped into danger to save others. 

Like, Matias Ferreira, a double-amputee Marine, who lost his legs in Afghanistan from an improvised explosive device.  In October of last year, he was just finishing his wedding rehearsal when he saw a car which had just crashed into a pole and the driver was pinned behind the steering wheel as smoke bellowed into the car and above it.  She was screaming, “My baby!  My baby!”  To which, Ferreira ran    to her aid, sprinting on his prosthetic legs.   

 

"With the Marines, you are taught to be prepared and act. Instinctively you just react, you don’t freeze, and thankfully we were able to make a difference. We didn’t know if the car was on fire or anything else. We knew we had to get them to safety."  Ferreira told New York Daily News.  

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